card making, Christmas, how to, papercrafts, tutorial

Super Simple Christmas Crafts 2: Wreath Card (Templates)

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Woop! Another installment of my Super Simple Christmas Crafts! This time making this attractive circle wreath card. You can watch the video tutorial for instructions here;

And here are the templates:

PDFs (for fussy cutting)

CIRCLE CARD BLANK PDF

HOLLY AND IVY LEAVES 1 PDF

HOLLY AND IVY LEAVES 2 PDF

Cut Files (for Silhouette Users):

Circle Card Blank

Holly and Ivy Leaves 1

Holly and Ivy Leaves 2

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Happy Crafting!

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Grace ❤ @ms.paperlover

Christmas, how to, papercrafts, trimcraft, tutorial

Super Simple Christmas Crafts 1 – Gift Box With Paper Poinsettia (with Templates)

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Aren’t these gift boxes cute? I love a Poinsettia, though I generally avoid having them in the house as they’re midly toxic to cats and mine has a tendency to chew on house plants.

So instead – I made some paper ones to decorate these gift boxes! I have a few people this year who are getting multiple small presents from me, rather than one big one. So I needed some lovely boxes to put all those little gifts in – though even the people who get one thing might be getting a box as well, I just love making them!

For the more traditional box on the right I used the First Edition Gift of Christmas Paper Pad, and for the one on the left I used the First Edition Merry Little Christmas.

The instructions on how to make these can be found in my corresponding video tutorial – it is a little long and rambly, sorry about that, I’m out of practice with video tutorials!

Here are the templates for the Poinsettia leaves, I used the first file for the ‘petal’ leaves, and the second for the larger leaves on the bottom.

For Silhouette Users:

Poinsettia Leaves 1

Poinsettia Leaves 2 

To print and cut as a template:

Poinsettia Leaves 1 PDF

Poinsettia Leaves 2 PDF

Of course if you have some leaf dies you can use those too, my templates really are very simple shapes. It would however be a good idea to have a few different sizes of leaf for the full effect.

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Right then, happy crafting everyone! Do tag me in anything you make and share – I’d love to see!

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Grace ❤ @ms.paperlover

card making, how to, papercrafts, tutorial

Creative Process – Pretty Posy Birthday Card

As the title implies, I made this card using the ‘Pretty Posy’ paper pad from Trimcraft’s First Edition range.

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(apologies for the price label still on there, but it damages the cover when you try and remove it!).

After choosing which papers I wanted to use, I started on sorting what elements I needed to make the card. First I fussy cut some florals and hearts from two of the papers (which you can see the pile of in the top left of the photo below).

I also tried out a new toy, this rather rudimentary circle cutter I got from The Works for a whopping £2. It isn’t great, but it’ll do for now.

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You can see here the four main parts of the card: the card blank (a 6×6 one). One 6×6 paper (one of the pearlescent designs), with the centre gutted out to make a frame. Then two papers cut to about 5.5×5.5″ (the green one slightly larger) with circles cut from the middle.

…oh, and the lid that covers the circle cutter’s blade has crept it’s way into the photo too, whoops!

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Then, assembly! The ‘birthday wishes’ is a cardstock sticker from a Pebbles sticker book – which I now wish I had purchased 2384023 of because I use it all the time for cards and now it’s discontinued, waaaaaah!

It’s also raised up on some foam tape. It was a bit fiddly and took a while to get the fussy cut elements in their right places, and required the combined efforts of foam tape, glue dots, pritt stick, and double sided tape to get the job done.

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But that’s not the end! I always like to add something to the back and centre of my cards, even if it’s something small, just so you don’t have a beautiful front of a card and then stark white space elsewhere.

So inside I just added some washi tape:

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For the back I did a little more, first I cut another paper to 6×6, and punched the corners with a fancy corner punch:

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Then embossed a ‘handmade with love’ stamp on top of some cut off paper I’d used for the front of the card, stuck a doily behind that, and there we go!

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I always find adding something to the back and centre of your card (other than your message, of course), makes a handmade card seem more ‘finished’.

Thanks so much for reading, and look out for some more card posts soon 🙂

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Oh I forgot – I added some flat back pearls too!

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Grace @ms.paperlover ❤

card making, how to, papercrafts, tutorial

Creative Process – A Teenager’s Birthday Card

When I make birthday (or anniversary or get well soon or whatever) cards, I don’t just make a load of generic cards and choose one for the recipient (though maybe I should, it would be far less time consuming), I really make them for that person; with them in mind. Their tastes, their aesthetic. And so on.

This card was for my eldest niece, for her fourteenth birthday. Being fourteen she needed something grown up enough, but also not too grown up (did that make sense? Probably not!). I chose the First Edition ‘Sweet Nothings’ paper pad by Trimcraft to make this card, as it has some seriously pretty papers in it.

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And the paper I chose for the base of my card is one of the textured papers with this beautiful wood and floral pattern on. I made the card 6×7″ (it needed to be slightly taller than 6″, you’re about to see why.

So I wanted to stitch my niece’s name onto the card. I printed off her name in one of my favourite fonts to stitch with (‘Beyond the Mountains’). This font does however often do this strange thing where it cuts off the bottom of some of the letters when you print so I filled in those bits with pencil.

I lined the template up to where I wanted it on my card and poked in the holes. If you’re new to paper stitching you can read my how-to on it here. Words are a little harder than shapes but it’s the same basic principle. Just make sure you have your printed template handy so you can use it for reference, sometimes all you can see is a load of holes and it’s hard to know what’s what.

I chose to stitch in white, as the cream thread I have is a bit of a yellow cream and so wouldn’t work with this card. But this turned out to be a bit of an error too as once the word was stitched it was quite hard to see. It shows up better on the picture above but in real life you had to squint to read it!

To solve this problem I decided to fill in the letters with some colour, using this ‘tea dye’ varnish, so that it would be a fairly subtle colour. As you may be able to see I did accidentally paint some of the thread, I don’t have a very steady hand, but it doesn’t matter too much!

Once that was all done and dry it was time to do the rest of the card. Whenever I’m doing a project like this I have a little root through my ephemera packs to see what I have to match, then throw it all into a little basket so it’s handy.

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Then, well, I stuck it on! I had a play around first, seeing what I wanted to put where, and I usually take a couple of photos on my phone to see what I like best. This is what I ended up with:

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It’s a mix of pieces from the cut-apart sheet from the Sweet Nothings paper pad, and some punch outs from it too. Then some random things I found in my ephemera root around!

The paper you can just see behind the card is what I used to line the inside. Because of the stitching on the front I had to cover up the mess of washi tape and knots that was behind it! IMG_3991

Being a teenager, my niece wanted money and make up for her birthday. I’d already wrapped the make up I’d bought her but I also made a little cash envelope using my WE R MEMORY KEEPERS 123 punch board. Which I stuck down with a velcro dot on the inside of the card so it would be easy for her to remove.

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I also wrote ‘for you’ on a black label with an embossing pen and embossed it with gold powder.

On every card I make I emboss this ‘handmade with love’ stamp too for something to put on the back of the card.

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The last thing to do was to make an envelope, again using my 123 punch board. I chose what I thought was a suitable paper from the First Edition pad…IMG_3999

…and once it was punched I also did some simple decoration on the front of the envelope, adding her name with alpha stickers. Which I forgot to take a picture of, woops!

So there it is, one of my homemade, personalised cards. Because of the stitching, which can take an absolute age, the whole thing probably took me about 90 minutes. But I love making my cards really special for my family and close friends.

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Oh I forgot, I added some flat back pearls too! That’s it… I think!

Thanks so much for reading, let me know if you’d like to see more card making posts 🙂

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Grace ❤ @ms.paperlover

 

Brimbles, brimbles sticker club, mixed media, sticker kit, tutorial

Brimbles July Sticker Club – Smoothie

 

Woop woop! My first post as a Brimbles Sticker Club design team member. This post is also featured on the brimbles blog.

Alright, I admit, I’m not so good at eating fruit, but I do like a smoothie. So when I saw this month’s kit I remembered some silly selfies I had on my phone I’d sent in a group chat after making myself a smoothie one day. I decided this month’s kit would be perfect for making a fun creative journal spread, featuring said silly selfies.

The first thing I did was throw some watercolour on the pages (of a standard size traveller’s notebook). I had the stickers nearby so I could make sure the colours matched. I made one side more green because I knew that’s where I was going to put the photos, which had lots of green in the background.

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While I waited for that to dry, I got out my Copic markers and fineliners and drew out and then coloured a glass full of smoothie. I’m fairly happy with how it turned out:

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(for Copic Marker users I used R00, RV10, RV13, and R85)

Then I painted the ’empty’ part of the glass with the same colours I’d painted the right hand page, went over the lines with a black fineliner, and cut it out:

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Then came sticking time! I started with some of the washi strips and boxes from the kit that I wanted in the background:

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Then stuck down my photos and the glass:

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Next was my favourite part of the whole layout. I started by getting the watercolours out again and painting a pink swirl going down into the glass:

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(yes I smudged the black fineliner a bit but it’s ok because it gets covered up!)

Then once that was dry I stuck down a load of the cute little fruit stickers on the swirl as if they were going down into the smoothie (sorry little fruits!)

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As you can see I purposely placed one sticker (the apple) where I could draw the rim of the glass over it, to really give the idea that they were going down into the glass of delicious smoothie!

After that I got sticker happy…

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Especially with those little phrase stickers. I LOVE a good pun, so those cracked me up far more than they really should have. The only stickers used that are not from this month’s kit are those I used for the ‘smoothie’ title. They were from Mrs Brimbles last year.

Then I got a little more sticker happy, just filling up some spaces that I thought looked like they needed a little something more. I even fussy cut out a little orange from the washi strip as a wanted a little fruit!

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Spot the little orange? Just a reminder to do whatever you want with stickers, cut boxes in half, fussy cut them, etc.,: they’re just as versatile as paper, but you don’t have to add glue! I also used the page flags from the functional sheet of stickers to make some bunting in the top corner.

And there we go! An admittedly, very silly journal spread, that was great fun to make. It’s not about anything important or life changing, but it’s a fun memory to look at.

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If you’re interested, I also have a process video on this spread which you can watch here, and I also used sticker’s from this kit to decorate a week in my personal size planner:

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I also have a Plan With Me Video on this spread.

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Grace ❤ @ms.paperlover

 

how to, tutorial

HOW TO – Paper Stitching (Simple)

I don’t know about you guys but I often find within the papercrafting (or crafting in general) world there are some things people just presume you know how to do. Things that may seem simple to some but if you don’t know how… then you don’t know how!

One of those things is paper stitching  by hand (or sewing). Something that is, yes, relatively simple, but something that is assumed that you just KNOW what to do. For those who have a background or even basic knowledge of sewing or cross stitch (such as myself) it seems easy and straightforward. But to some people it’s not; and that’s ok.

It’s ok to not know how to do stuff, stuff that seems so simple to the rest of the world. I guarantee you there are more people than you think wondering how to do it.

So I’m going to show you how to paper stitch by hand. I am by no means an expert, but I’ll make it simple and won’t use fancy-wancy words (or if I do I’ll explain them).

So first, what you’ll need:

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First you’ll need a pointy tool of some kind to make holes in the paper. You could, I suppose, use a large needle, but your hands and fingers won’t thank you for it. Search on eBay (or your website of choice) for a ‘paper pricking tool’, or get an awl. Technically an awl is for beading and jewellery making type stuff but it does the same job. The Tim Holtz Retractable Craft Picker  is a popular choice, but not the cheapest.

Then you will need some sort of mat to do your pricking on (don’t laugh!). You can get proper pricking or piercing mats from all sorts of places, but I’m cheap – so I use this foam heart covered in felt I bought in Hobbycraft (in the kids section!) for less than £1. Sure it won’t last as long as a ‘proper’ mat, but it does the job! You could also use foam mats or corrugated cardboard from an old box. They won’t be as easy to use, particularly the cardboard, but if it’s your first time you don’t want to really splash out on the equipment.

Next you’ll need a needle, ideally an embroidery needle that doesn’t have a sharp end (ouchies!) but really you can use whatever. Just as long as the eye is big enough for the thread to go through and it’s not too wide to go through the holes you pierce!

Last is some thread, obviously. Most people, including yours truly, use embroidery thread/silk. I buy mine from eBay in bulk (I only really need cream and white) but you can pick the stuff up from all sorts of places.

Oh, and I nearly forgot – some paper! Well, card or cardstock really – paper is a little flimsy. I’ve just punched out a 3″ heart from a random bit of cardstock I had lying around for the purpose of this how to as I wanted it to be a simple shape.

Ok, let’s get started. Step one – PRICK!

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I don’t think there’s too much to explain here. Don’t push the tool too far through or your holes will be too big. Space them however you want, except don’t go too close or they might tear and leave you with one giant hole. And don’t make them too near the edge of the card, you want a few millimetres or when you start stitching the thread will fall out the sides –  one thing to remember is card is not as sturdy as material, and is way more likely to tear when making holes in it!

Step Two – thread dat needle!

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Two things to say about this: one, embroidery thread/silk is made of six very small strands. You do not want to do this with all six strands, so split it into two strands of three. Don’t go too fast or you’ll end up with a big knot.

You can actually use however many strands you damn well please, but I find three to be the best.

I forgot to picture it, but it will save you lots of stress and frustration if you use a needle threader with that embroidery silk. Those multiple strands can be an absolute pain to get through the eye.

Step Three – start stitching! With your first stitch start from the bottom through to the top, then underneath secure with some washi.

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If you’re old school or simply inclined to do so, you can of course make a knot or two instead- or if you don’t have washi to use (in which case we need to have words). But securing your thread down with washi is just SO much easier.

Step Four – continue to stitch!

Now, there’s two ways we can go about this, the first is the simple up-down-up-down stitch, which is fine, but doesn’t look as nice. To get the traditional ‘paper stitching’ look, you need to back-stitch. Many of you will be thinking ‘DUH, I know how back stitch!’, but as I said at the beginning of this post, not everyone does, so here goes:

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Bring your needle through from the bottom/underneath of your card, then instead of going forward, go backward, when you bring the needle back through the card. Then from underneath, skip over a hole when you bring the needle back through to the top.

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Then just do the same thing again. Up through, go backwards a hole to pull it down through the bottom, skip a hole underneath, and bring it back through the top. Repeat ad nauseam.

And that’s it!

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When you’ve finished and snipped off the excess thread remember to secure down the last little bit with washi again. If you’ve run out of thread at any point during it’s fine, just start again from where the thread ran out! The backs of my paper stitching projects are always a mess of washi because I’m hilariously terrible at estimating how much thread I’ll need!

I very quickly did an example of how the stitching would look if you did the very simple up-down stitch rather than the back-stitch:

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I got away with these due to the dots on the paper making it look from a distance like I’ve done more stitching than I have. But I definitely think the back-stitch looks best.

So there we go! A, hopefully, very simple guide on how to do paper stitching. I chose very simple shapes for this post but you can stitch any shape you want to. I do lot of word stitching, which is a smidgen more complicated as it just requires a bit more attention. I may do another post on how to do that in the future, so look out for that!

For now, I shall leave you, and wish you the best for all your paper stitching projects!

If there’s any papercrafting related thing you’ve always wanted to know how to do, but been afraid that it’s too ‘simple’ to ask about, or that people might laugh at you for asking, please ask! I’d be more than happy to do a tutorial on it.

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Grace ❤ @ms.paperlover